Home Page
Case Studies and Articles  Latest
A dairy farmer has been fined for chaotic record keeping that may have contributed to the spread of bovine tuberculosis on his premises.  read more...read more...
A young lad is forced to slaughter his pet cow because of the current bovine TB policy.  read more...read more...
A 33 year old farmer and father of two in Shrophsire was killed by a bull as he tested cattle for bTB. He was conducting routine bTB testing on cows at Ashwood Farm in Whitchurch on 3 December 2013 when he was fatally injured by a bull  read more...read more...
There is such a focus on badgers that the fact that bovine TB is a cattle based problem has been set on one side. History has shown us that the incidence of TB in cattle can be brought down to a very low level by cattle based measures alone. Add to this the vaccination of badgers in hot spot areas and even their implication can be dealt with.  read more...read more...
Looking at some of the anti cull websites and having kept a close eye on media reports during the trial culls that have recently finished in Gloucestershire and Somerset, it would seem that if the culling is rolled out into other areas the level of opposition is not going to get less and could even worsen, meaning that policing costs alone (paid for from public funds) are going to be exorbitant.  read more...read more...
This article is a summary of the significant legal proceedings relating to incidents re cattle and bovine TB.  read more...read more...
In this well researched article by Mike Rendle he poses this question: 'Are badger infections following, not leading, bovine TB infections in cattle? ' and discovers some very interesting facts about cattle, badgers and bovine TB.  read more...read more...
Bovine TB - the views of a farmer based on field-based observations over many years. Peter Aspin was a herdsman, then a dairy farmer. He is now a beef farmer and also has a contract rearing dairy heifers for a local farmer. He was conventional and is now organic. He also run the Shropshire Agroforestry Project. All on 40 acres. To understand bovine TB one must first understand how significantly livestock husbandry practices have changed in recent years. I was on a dairy farm a couple of years ago - a closed herd (one that reared all its own replacement youngstock) - which had had its first bTB breakdown. Two veterinarians had arrived to do the follow-up sixty day retest. Talking to them I asked what they thought was the source of the problem. Their immediate response was that the adjacent dairy farm had purchased imported cattle the previous year, this herd had subsequently developed bTB and passed the infection either directly or via a vector to the neighbouring herd. Whether the imported cattle were themselves carriers of bTB or whether they had no immunity, I do not know and I assumed the vets did not know but the issue of cattle importation is a major concern for both farmers and vets. Ever increasing numbers of dairy cattle are being imported simply because they are cheaper if large enough numbers are purchased. I know of a herd of over two thousand dairy cows where not a single replacement animal is home-reared, every single one arrives on a lorry from mainland Europe.  read more...read more...
Dairy farm worker, Steve Jones, is not happy about the future of the dairy industry, or the current policy to cull badgers. The industry has many problems. Bovine tuberculosis is just one.'The cattle industry is long overdue for reform', he says. Here he sets out his comments.  read more...read more...
Farmers break law in bovine TB hot spot area. Mother and daughter Kathleen Wallis, 61, and Sarah Wallis, 23, of Appleton Farm, at Wick St Lawrence, near Weston-super-Mare, admitted 18 counts of providing false information as to the location of a number of their cattle when they appeared before Bristol Crown Court. The farmers admitted to failing to adhere to cattle disease control laws and were branded "ignorant, rotten and cruel" by a judge.  read more...read more...

Dairy Farmer in Wales fined

Printer FriendlyTell a Friend
A dairy farmer has been fined for chaotic record keeping that may have contributed to the spread of bovine tuberculosis on his premises. James Thomas, who owns premises known as Posty Uchaf in Abernant, was ordered to pay £14,000 in costs and a £120 victim surcharge at Llanelli Magistrates’ Court on Friday July 19. All cattle are legally required to have animal passports and ear tags with a unique identification number that must be kept for life. But during a series of visits to his premises between February and October in 2017, it was found many cattle at Mr Thomas’ farm were either missing ear tags or passports, or weren’t on BCMS (British Cattle Movement Service) records. It was also found some animals had moved on the premises without permission while the farm was under tuberculosis restrictions. During tuberculosis testing at the farm, a number of animals registered to the holding were found to be missing. Other animals produced were unregistered, with some having been moved on and off the premises without informing the BCMS. Carmarthenshire Council, working closely with the Welsh Government and the Animal and Plant Health Agency, brought the prosecution. Mr Thomas pleaded guilty to offences including breaching tuberculosis regulations, for which he was fined £2,000. He was also fined a combined £2,200 for a number of offences in breach of cattle identification regulations. In mitigation, the solicitor acting for Mr Thomas advised the court that other employees helping run the farm at the time had failed to keep records up to date, although Mr Thomas apologised and accepted ultimate responsibility. The court was also informed that Mr Thomas, who is looking to retire from farming, was away on holidays when animals were moved on to the premises during its tuberculosis restriction. Cllr Phillip Hughes, Carmarthenshire Council’s Executive Board Member for Public Protection, said: “The council works closely alongside partner organisations to ensure full traceability of products from our farms, and this shows we will take action when poor record-keeping puts the health and welfare of animals at risk. “Cattle identification isn’t just a legal requirement – it’s also essential to control the spread of animal disease in the event of an outbreak, while helping farmers improve production and profitability. “The contribution of agricultural businesses to Carmarthenshire’s economy is hugely appreciated, but farmers must comply with legislation to maintain the county’s excellent reputation for high quality produce.” https://www.southwalesguardian.co.uk/news/17794505.chaotic-record-keeping-lands-farmer-court/

Rate this article.
Article isn't rated yet.  Write a review.

-->
Free CMS by ViArt Ltd