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A young lad is forced to slaughter his pet cow because of the current bovine TB policy.  read more...read more...
A 33 year old farmer and father of two in Shrophsire was killed by a bull as he tested cattle for bTB. He was conducting routine bTB testing on cows at Ashwood Farm in Whitchurch on 3 December 2013 when he was fatally injured by a bull  read more...read more...
There is such a focus on badgers that the fact that bovine TB is a cattle based problem has been set on one side. History has shown us that the incidence of TB in cattle can be brought down to a very low level by cattle based measures alone. Add to this the vaccination of badgers in hot spot areas and even their implication can be dealt with.  read more...read more...
Looking at some of the anti cull websites and having kept a close eye on media reports during the trial culls that have recently finished in Gloucestershire and Somerset, it would seem that if the culling is rolled out into other areas the level of opposition is not going to get less and could even worsen, meaning that policing costs alone (paid for from public funds) are going to be exorbitant.  read more...read more...
This article is a summary of the significant legal proceedings relating to incidents re cattle and bovine TB.  read more...read more...
In this well researched article by Mike Rendle he poses this question: 'Are badger infections following, not leading, bovine TB infections in cattle? ' and discovers some very interesting facts about cattle, badgers and bovine TB.  read more...read more...
Bovine TB - the views of a farmer based on field-based observations over many years. Peter Aspin was a herdsman, then a dairy farmer. He is now a beef farmer and also has a contract rearing dairy heifers for a local farmer. He was conventional and is now organic. He also run the Shropshire Agroforestry Project. All on 40 acres. To understand bovine TB one must first understand how significantly livestock husbandry practices have changed in recent years. I was on a dairy farm a couple of years ago - a closed herd (one that reared all its own replacement youngstock) - which had had its first bTB breakdown. Two veterinarians had arrived to do the follow-up sixty day retest. Talking to them I asked what they thought was the source of the problem. Their immediate response was that the adjacent dairy farm had purchased imported cattle the previous year, this herd had subsequently developed bTB and passed the infection either directly or via a vector to the neighbouring herd. Whether the imported cattle were themselves carriers of bTB or whether they had no immunity, I do not know and I assumed the vets did not know but the issue of cattle importation is a major concern for both farmers and vets. Ever increasing numbers of dairy cattle are being imported simply because they are cheaper if large enough numbers are purchased. I know of a herd of over two thousand dairy cows where not a single replacement animal is home-reared, every single one arrives on a lorry from mainland Europe.  read more...read more...
Dairy farm worker, Steve Jones, is not happy about the future of the dairy industry, or the current policy to cull badgers. The industry has many problems. Bovine tuberculosis is just one.'The cattle industry is long overdue for reform', he says. Here he sets out his comments.  read more...read more...
Farmers break law in bovine TB hot spot area. Mother and daughter Kathleen Wallis, 61, and Sarah Wallis, 23, of Appleton Farm, at Wick St Lawrence, near Weston-super-Mare, admitted 18 counts of providing false information as to the location of a number of their cattle when they appeared before Bristol Crown Court. The farmers admitted to failing to adhere to cattle disease control laws and were branded "ignorant, rotten and cruel" by a judge.  read more...read more...
A Tewkesbury farmer has been fined after selling milk from cattle with bTB. The cattle which had tested positive for TB but the farmer, Timothy Juckes, refused to believe the cows had the disease. He sent four cows without the disease to the slaughterhouse instead of the infected animals, Gloucester Crown Court heard on 28th June 2013. He then took compensation from Defra for the livestock, which should have been destroyed.  read more...read more...

SUMMARY OF LEGAL AND OTHER CASES RELATING TO BOVINE TB

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FARMER INJECTS HIS CATTLE WITH SLURRY
A former Young Dairy Farmer of the Year nominee was jailed for three years in the summer of 2001 for injecting his cattle with slurry in order to defraud the State of £20,000 bovine TB compensation. Cornelius Keane (then 38), from Bawnbue, Drimoleague, Co Cork, had pleaded guilty to five sample charges arising from his decision to inject potentially poisonous and harmful material into his 49-strong cattle herd on January 25, 2000, in a bid to obtain TB reactor grants.

Judge AG Murphy warned Keane that his cruelty merited a lifetime ban from farming but that the court did not have the power to impose this censure.

He added that Keane would have received a seven-year rather than three-year prison term but for the fact he acted out of sheer desperation to save his farm and that his wife, Mary, was then pregnant with their fifth child.

Cork Circuit Criminal Court heard that when Department of Agriculture vets inspected Keane's farm after becoming suspicious about his TB test results, they were horrified at what they found. Supt Veterinary Inspector, John Murray, told the court he found the cattle in severe pain, some of them with "half Gaelic-football-sized swellings" on their necks. These swellings were oozing poisonous puss.

The 37-year-old West Cork farmer pleaded guilty to sample offences, including breaches of the Criminal Damage Act (1991), Bovine TB Order (1989), Diseases of Animals Act (1979) and the Protection of Animals Act (1911).

The court was told Keane injected his cattle on January 25th 2000 with caustic slurry run-off from his milking parlour, a poison calculated to interfere with the accuracy of the Department of Agriculture's normal tuberculin test for TB.

His farm had already been restricted because of TB outbreaks for two years. If it was again confirmed in his herd, he stood to benefit from £21,320 in reactor grants coupled with £980 per month in income-support payments.

Info from: www.independent.ie/national-news/cruel-farmer-jailed-for-bovine-tb-fraud-345351.html

CARMARTHENSHIRE FARMER CONVICTED FOR INTERFERING WITH bTB TEST

www.bovinetb.co.uk/article.php?article_id=85

In January 2010 a Carmarthenshire farmer, William Organ of Penrhiwdilfa, Gwernogle, was convicted for interfering with bovine TB testing. He admitted 14 offences of injecting grit and other material into the cattle in an attempt to falsify the test results between September 2007 and January 2008. He was fined a total of £12,600 and ordered to pay legal costs of £3,000.

DAIRY HERD, CORNWALL PUT ON MOVEMENT RESTRICTION
www.bovinetb.co.uk/article.php?article_id=77

January 2010 the largest dairy herd in the west country, Wills Bros Ltd, was put under movement restrictions following the discovery of an inconclusive reactor during a pre-movement TB test. This restriction should have prevented any unlicensed movements onto or off the premises until a second and negative TB test had been obtained at least 60 days after the initial test. However, Defra vet, Cliff Mitchell, noticed an article and photo in the local paper, The Cornish Guardian, showing the Wills family with show results from the National All-Breeds Show at Stoneleigh, Warwickshire. This prompted a joint investigation by Defra vets and Cornwall Council's Trading Standard's animal health team. They discovered a range of errors in the herd's records.

EAR TAG FRAID POWYSs
www.bovinetb.co.uk/article.php?article_id=93

In June 2011, after admitting six offences involving swapping the identities of cattle a Powys farmer, Emyr Jones Evans of Llanfihangel-yng-Ngwynfa, near Llanfyllin received a 12 month prison sentence, suspended for 18 months for breaching bovine TB regulations. He also had to pay £28,900 in court costs.

County Fermanagh
www.bovinetb.co.uk/article_print.php?article_id=92

COUNTY FERMANAGH - INTERFERENCE WITH TEST Stephen Crawford, a County Fermanagh farmer failed to get consent for a judicial review from the Department of Agriculture after he had failed to be paid for pedigree Limousin killed following bovine tuberculosis checks. The Department of Agriculture took the decision to initially withhold £168,000 in compensation for the slaughtered cattle while suspected irregularities in the tests carried out in 2006 were investigated. Mr Crawford, of Greenhill Road, Maguiresbridge, was prosecuted for allegedly interfering with the process by administering an unknown substance. He was acquitted of all 11 charges brought against him under the Diseases of Animals (Northern Ireland) Order 1981.

EAR TAG FRAUDS GENERAL
www.bovinetb.co.uk/article.php?article_id=81
www.bovinetb.co.uk/article.php?article_id=93
www.bovinetb.co.uk/article.php?article_id=98

Investigations by the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) and Trading Standards have revealed that some farmers are swapping ear tags from dairy cattle that have tested positive for bovine TB, with animals that are less productive. The less productive animals are then sent for slaughter and the farmer is compensated for the loss. The alleged evidence of fraud originally emerged from an investigation instigated by Gloucestershire trading standards officers who reviewed TB cattle sent to two slaughterhouses. A spokesman for Defra has said that three cases in England were already on their way to prosecution and investigations are continuing.

According to media reports in 2010 there were problems of untagged cattle in Ireland. Some seventy cattle were seized in Co Cork, Ireland by the Department of Agriculture's special investigation unit and Garda teams at the start of 2010. Shortly after this they seized another 56 unidentified cattle in Co Cork. The cattle were found on a number of farms in north Cork and none of them had identification tags in their ears. The official raids took place over a number of weeks after officials from the local offices of the Department of Agriculture and Food had been concerned about certain herds in the area. Some five farms are reported to have been visited by the investigating teams, which rounded up the animals and looked for identification for them. The first of the untagged animals were uncovered in raids on two farms in the Macroom and Dunmanway areas in January 2010. According to one blog it was believed a gang was operating in the area offering to buy animals for a very low price from farmers who had failed to tag or present animals for mandatory bovine TB or brucellosis tests.

Cheshire farmers
www.bovinetb.co.uk/article.php?article_id=84 FINED FOR BREACHING TB RESTRICTIONS

Anthony Kirkham and his son Nicholas Kirkham, of Ridley Farm in Tarporley, have been fined more than £6,000 for breaching TB restrictions relating to the movement of cattle on and off Ridley Farm and Butlands Paddock, based in Spurstow, Cheshire, in breach of tuberculosis restriction notices served by the Department for the Environment Food and Rural Affairs on June 28, 2009. They appeared before South Cheshire Magistrates Court to face charges brought by Cheshire East Council’s animal health department. At the hearing on Friday January 21, Anthony Kirkham admitted 87 offences of moving cattle between January and June 2010, and asked for 102 offences to be taken into consideration. He was fined £5,756 and ordered to pay costs of £4,561.83.

SHROPSHIRE VET SUSPENDED
www.bovinetb.co.uk/article.php?article_id=80

15 March 2100 the Disciplinary Committee of the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons (RCVS) suspended from the Register for ten months a veterinary surgeon found to have dishonestly certified that he carried out bovine tuberculosis (TB) testing and measured and recorded the test reactions of 248 cattle, when in fact he knew he had not tested all the animals. The RCVS is the regulatory body for veterinary surgeons in the UK and deals with issues of professional misconduct, maintaining the register of veterinary surgeons eligible to practise in the UK and assuring standards of veterinary education.



CATTLE SHOT WREXHAM
www.bovinetb.co.uk/article.php?article_id=83
AT In a rather unusual incident thirty cattle were shot in March 2011 after escaping from a farm. A council spokesman said the cull was not due to disease but with WAG’s obsession with eradicating bovine TB and biosecurity we wonder if this was the underlying reason for the action taken in this case. Certainly it raises many questions.

CEREDIGION VET SUSPENDED
www.bovinetb.co.uk/article.php?article_id=88

Vet denies failing to carry out accurate checks for bovine TB and submitting paperwork which reported he had done so. Alleged he tested 104 animals, but allegedly simply glanced at some and used his thumb and forefinger to measure others instead of using proper instruments. Failure to measure folds some or all of the records entered on the certificate were false and he was inaccurate in his certification.

DAIRY FARMER COMMITS SUICIDE AFTER COMMITTING EAR TAF FRAUDS
www.bovinetb.co.uk/article.php?article_id=98

Dairy farmer from Elmore Back in Gloucestershire commits suicide after being investigated for ear tag and passport irregularities
John Round, 44, a dairy farmer from Elmore Back in Gloucestershire, took his own life allegedly because he was being investigated for ear tag and passport irregularities. he died after deliberately by-passing the safety cut-out on his tele-handler. He was found in the farm’s silage pit crushed against the side wall. Former Trading Standards officer, Nigel Durnford, told the inquest in Cheltenham held in September 2011 that the investigation had been about cattle, which had been sent for slaughter after reacting to bovine TB testing. He said it was believed the cattle sent for slaughter were not those which had reacted positive at the farm, and that their ear tags and cattle passports had been changed. DNA samples apparently showed none of the five cattle in question were related to their listed offspring or their dams, he said. In a statement made three weeks before his death, Mr Round said that cattle ear tags were changed when they got damaged, and some may have been given the wrong tags, but he was satisfied all the correct cattle had been sent for slaughter.

The inquest heard the father of three had been ‘worried’ about the investigation and the day before his death. He had been told that his biggest customer, Dairy Crest, would no longer buy the farm’s milk. Summing up, deputy Gloucestershire coroner, David Dooley, said he was satisfied that Mr Round had intended to take his own life. The verdict was suicide.

FLINTSHIRE FARMERS BLAME bTB FOR CATTLE NEGLECT
www.bovinetb.co.uk/article.php?article_id=99

On 22 September 2011 Mold Magistrates Court dealt with a case brothers, Gareth and Kenneth Jones, of Wern Fawr Farm, Caerwys. The two farmers (brothers) involved had apparently bought too many cows and could not afford to feed them and ‘a number of cows’ had died as a result of malnutrition. The brothers were prosecuted, by the council, for failing to provide an appropriate diet/bedding for the cows and suitable accommodation for sheep.

The judge heard that the brothers were unable to sell their cows at anything other than a considerable loss because of bovine TB ‘lockdown’ restrictions, but they could not afford to feed them all.

The brothers were given a community order, which requires them to stay indoors at their home between 9pm and 5am – Gareth Jones for four months and Kenneth for two months. Both are to be fitted with electronic tags and they were ordered to pay £6,500 each in prosecution costs.

CATTLE MOVEMENT OFFENCES NEATH
www.tradingstandardswales.org.uk/prosecutions/Monsaninalhealth.cfm and www.bovinetb.co.uk/article.php?article_id=103
Ccattle dealer from Neath, Port Talbot as well as land in Monmouthshire


At Newport magistrates court a cattle dealer who operates from Neath, Port Talbot as well as land in Monmouthshire pleaded guilty to 22 offences under the Cattle Identification (Wales) Regulations 2007 with the court being informed that there were approximately 2500 offences altogether and that the ones before them were specimens.

Offences related to moves on and off holdings under the dealers control in Neath Port Talbot and Monmouthshire and included cattle that had moved through the local livestock markets as well as various other premises across South Wales. Under the cattle identification regulations it is a requirement that all moves on and off livestock premises are notified to the British Cattle Movement Service (BCMS) within 3 days of any movement taking place.

ANGLESEY VET PRACTICE BANNED FROM bTB TESTING
www.bovinetb.co.uk/article.php?article_id=109

A veterinary practice has been banned from testing cattle for bovine TB after it was found out it wasn’t conducting the process properly. The practice is the Gaerwen based vets Bennett-Williams that sent out letters to farmers and farming unions explaining the disruption to TB testing.

Cattle farmers who use the practice for TB testing were told by Department of Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA) to make alternative testing arrangements after an audit of TB testing procedures identified the problems.

To regain the right to deal with TB, vets at the practice will need to be re-trained.

VET SUSPENDED ANGLESEY
http://www.theonlinemail.co.uk/bangor-and-anglesey-news/local-bangor-and-anglesey-news/2012/04/18/anglesey-vets-pracice-banned-from- testing-for-bovine-tb-66580-30786655
A spokesman for the Animal, Health and Veterinary Laboratories Agency (AHVLA) part of government’s DEFRA department said: “Following an audit of TB testing procedures, which identified a failure to follow standard operating procedures, AHVLA has suspended a private veterinary surgeon working in North Wales from operating as a panel 1a (bovine TB testing) official veterinarian, pending re-training.

EAR TAGGING OFFENCES, GLOUCESTER
Info from www.thisisgloucestershire.co.uk/Fraudulent-farmer-Timothy-Juckes-continued-sell/story-17573639-detail/story.html
In December 2012 a farmer was found guilty of ear tagging and related offences. The fraud offences could be summarised as deliberate swapping of identities of TB reactor cattle with healthy livestock; retaining the reactor animal and producing milk from it; and in one case having a calf born to a reactor cow. Farmer Timothy Juckes, 36, kept on selling milk from cattle which had tested positive for TB and should have been destroyed, a court heard. The farmer, from Gloucestershire, one of the alleged bTB hot spot counties and venue for one of the infamous pilot cull trials, was prosecuted by the Gloucestershire Trading Standards department. Juckes, of Tredington House, Tredington, near Tewkesbury, admitted 10 charges of fraud against Defra.

Four of his animals reacted to TB tests carried out by a Government vet and had been condemned to slaughter, Gloucester Crown Court was told. But instead of having them put down, Juckes sent the livestock to the slaughterhouse instead,. He was then paid compensation - a total of £4,173, plus £1225 for the later animal - by Defra for the livestock which should have been destroyed but he also earned money by selling milk from condemned animals. Because there is to be a Proceeds of Crime investigation into his finances to determine what assets he has and what his criminal benefit was Judge William Hart decided to adjourn sentence. He said he had a 'substantial' financial penalty and costs in mind once the Proceeds of Crime position had been finalised.

Mr Liddiard told the court that on October 15, 2010, a veterinary inspector went to Mr Juckes' farm and found that three cattle were positive reactors to TB. Another test was carried out the following month and there was a single reactor animal and he was told that, too, had to be slaughtered. The court was told that; 'The prosecution amounts to this: in reality he did not send any of the four reactor animals to slaughter. He did send four animals, but not those four.' He had sold milk from one of the animals for a year, earning £3,500 for it. "He went about ensuring that he could continue to use these animals. It was a fairly deliberate and fairly persistent process on his part," he said.

Judge William Hart told Adam Vaitilingham, defending, that he was not considering a prison sentence or an unpaid work order and a financial penalty was appropriate. He bailed Juckes to a date to be fixed after April 1, adding: "I will not be sending you to prison."

BOVINE TB REGULATIONS BREACHES INCLUDING MOVEMENTS, BUNBURY, CHESHIRE

Farmer, Anthony Kirkham, of Ridley Farm near Bunbury, has been given a four-month custodial sentence, suspended for two years, after he pleaded guilty at Crewe Magistrates Court to eight offences relating to at bovine tuberculosis (TB) restrictions.

The farm was placed under TB restrictions in April 2011, after a cow was found to have tested positive re bovine TB. This meant that animals could not be moved on or off his farm without a veterinary risk assessment being carried out and a movement licence granted.

Mr Kirkham admitted that he had moved a cow on to his farm while under restrictions without a licence and also that he had moved cattle from the TB exempt market at Chelford to ‘non-permitted destinations’.

Just a few months earlier Mr Kirkham had also been ordered to pay a fine and prosecution costs in the region of £10,000 for similar offences related to breaches of a TB restriction notice.

Additionally, Mr Kirkham had been fined £13,000 in 2003, for breaching legislation to control the spread of foot and mouth diseases.

Along with the custodial sentence, Mr Kirkham was ordered to pay costs of £5,998.40.

Info from: www.crewechronicle.co.uk/crewe-news/local-crewe-news/2013/05/29/farm-near-bunbury-admits-bovine-tb-regulations-breach-96135-33396763/ FARMER INJECTS HIS CATTLE WITH SLURRY
A former Young Dairy Farmer of the Year nominee was jailed for three years in the summer of 2001 for injecting his cattle with slurry in order to defraud the State of £20,000 bovine TB compensation. Cornelius Keane (then 38), from Bawnbue, Drimoleague, Co Cork, had pleaded guilty to five sample charges arising from his decision to inject potentially poisonous and harmful material into his 49-strong cattle herd on January 25, 2000, in a bid to obtain TB reactor grants.

Judge AG Murphy warned Keane that his cruelty merited a lifetime ban from farming but that the court did not have the power to impose this censure.

He added that Keane would have received a seven-year rather than three-year prison term but for the fact he acted out of sheer desperation to save his farm and that his wife, Mary, was then pregnant with their fifth child.

Cork Circuit Criminal Court heard that when Department of Agriculture vets inspected Keane's farm after becoming suspicious about his TB test results, they were horrified at what they found. Supt Veterinary Inspector, John Murray, told the court he found the cattle in severe pain, some of them with "half Gaelic-football-sized swellings" on their necks. These swellings were oozing poisonous puss.

The 37-year-old West Cork farmer pleaded guilty to sample offences, including breaches of the Criminal Damage Act (1991), Bovine TB Order (1989), Diseases of Animals Act (1979) and the Protection of Animals Act (1911).

The court was told Keane injected his cattle on January 25th 2000 with caustic slurry run-off from his milking parlour, a poison calculated to interfere with the accuracy of the Department of Agriculture's normal tuberculin test for TB.

His farm had already been restricted because of TB outbreaks for two years. If it was again confirmed in his herd, he stood to benefit from £21,320 in reactor grants coupled with £980 per month in income-support payments.

Info from: www.independent.ie/national-news/cruel-farmer-jailed-for-bovine-tb-fraud-345351.html

CARMARTHENSHIRE FARMER CONVICTED FOR INTERFERING WITH bTB TEST

www.bovinetb.co.uk/article.php?article_id=85

In January 2010 a Carmarthenshire farmer, William Organ of Penrhiwdilfa, Gwernogle, was convicted for interfering with bovine TB testing. He admitted 14 offences of injecting grit and other material into the cattle in an attempt to falsify the test results between September 2007 and January 2008. He was fined a total of £12,600 and ordered to pay legal costs of £3,000.

DAIRY HERD, CORNWALL PUT ON MOVEMENT RESTRICTION
www.bovinetb.co.uk/article.php?article_id=77

January 2010 the largest dairy herd in the west country, Wills Bros Ltd, was put under movement restrictions following the discovery of an inconclusive reactor during a pre-movement TB test. This restriction should have prevented any unlicensed movements onto or off the premises until a second and negative TB test had been obtained at least 60 days after the initial test. However, Defra vet, Cliff Mitchell, noticed an article and photo in the local paper, The Cornish Guardian, showing the Wills family with show results from the National All-Breeds Show at Stoneleigh, Warwickshire. This prompted a joint investigation by Defra vets and Cornwall Council's Trading Standard's animal health team. They discovered a range of errors in the herd's records.

EAR TAG FRAID POWYSs
www.bovinetb.co.uk/article.php?article_id=93

In June 2011, after admitting six offences involving swapping the identities of cattle a Powys farmer, Emyr Jones Evans of Llanfihangel-yng-Ngwynfa, near Llanfyllin received a 12 month prison sentence, suspended for 18 months for breaching bovine TB regulations. He also had to pay £28,900 in court costs.

County Fermanagh
www.bovinetb.co.uk/article_print.php?article_id=92

COUNTY FERMANAGH - INTERFERENCE WITH TEST Stephen Crawford, a County Fermanagh farmer failed to get consent for a judicial review from the Department of Agriculture after he had failed to be paid for pedigree Limousin killed following bovine tuberculosis checks. The Department of Agriculture took the decision to initially withhold £168,000 in compensation for the slaughtered cattle while suspected irregularities in the tests carried out in 2006 were investigated. Mr Crawford, of Greenhill Road, Maguiresbridge, was prosecuted for allegedly interfering with the process by administering an unknown substance. He was acquitted of all 11 charges brought against him under the Diseases of Animals (Northern Ireland) Order 1981.

EAR TAG FRAUDS GENERAL
www.bovinetb.co.uk/article.php?article_id=81
www.bovinetb.co.uk/article.php?article_id=93
www.bovinetb.co.uk/article.php?article_id=98

Investigations by the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) and Trading Standards have revealed that some farmers are swapping ear tags from dairy cattle that have tested positive for bovine TB, with animals that are less productive. The less productive animals are then sent for slaughter and the farmer is compensated for the loss. The alleged evidence of fraud originally emerged from an investigation instigated by Gloucestershire trading standards officers who reviewed TB cattle sent to two slaughterhouses. A spokesman for Defra has said that three cases in England were already on their way to prosecution and investigations are continuing.

According to media reports in 2010 there were problems of untagged cattle in Ireland. Some seventy cattle were seized in Co Cork, Ireland by the Department of Agriculture's special investigation unit and Garda teams at the start of 2010. Shortly after this they seized another 56 unidentified cattle in Co Cork. The cattle were found on a number of farms in north Cork and none of them had identification tags in their ears. The official raids took place over a number of weeks after officials from the local offices of the Department of Agriculture and Food had been concerned about certain herds in the area. Some five farms are reported to have been visited by the investigating teams, which rounded up the animals and looked for identification for them. The first of the untagged animals were uncovered in raids on two farms in the Macroom and Dunmanway areas in January 2010. According to one blog it was believed a gang was operating in the area offering to buy animals for a very low price from farmers who had failed to tag or present animals for mandatory bovine TB or brucellosis tests.

Cheshire farmers
www.bovinetb.co.uk/article.php?article_id=84 FINED FOR BREACHING TB RESTRICTIONS

Anthony Kirkham and his son Nicholas Kirkham, of Ridley Farm in Tarporley, have been fined more than £6,000 for breaching TB restrictions relating to the movement of cattle on and off Ridley Farm and Butlands Paddock, based in Spurstow, Cheshire, in breach of tuberculosis restriction notices served by the Department for the Environment Food and Rural Affairs on June 28, 2009. They appeared before South Cheshire Magistrates Court to face charges brought by Cheshire East Council’s animal health department. At the hearing on Friday January 21, Anthony Kirkham admitted 87 offences of moving cattle between January and June 2010, and asked for 102 offences to be taken into consideration. He was fined £5,756 and ordered to pay costs of £4,561.83.

SHROPSHIRE VET SUSPENDED
www.bovinetb.co.uk/article.php?article_id=80

15 March 2100 the Disciplinary Committee of the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons (RCVS) suspended from the Register for ten months a veterinary surgeon found to have dishonestly certified that he carried out bovine tuberculosis (TB) testing and measured and recorded the test reactions of 248 cattle, when in fact he knew he had not tested all the animals. The RCVS is the regulatory body for veterinary surgeons in the UK and deals with issues of professional misconduct, maintaining the register of veterinary surgeons eligible to practise in the UK and assuring standards of veterinary education.



CATTLE SHOT WREXHAM
www.bovinetb.co.uk/article.php?article_id=83
AT In a rather unusual incident thirty cattle were shot in March 2011 after escaping from a farm. A council spokesman said the cull was not due to disease but with WAG’s obsession with eradicating bovine TB and biosecurity we wonder if this was the underlying reason for the action taken in this case. Certainly it raises many questions.

CEREDIGION VET SUSPENDED
www.bovinetb.co.uk/article.php?article_id=88

Vet denies failing to carry out accurate checks for bovine TB and submitting paperwork which reported he had done so. Alleged he tested 104 animals, but allegedly simply glanced at some and used his thumb and forefinger to measure others instead of using proper instruments. Failure to measure folds some or all of the records entered on the certificate were false and he was inaccurate in his certification.

DAIRY FARMER COMMITS SUICIDE AFTER COMMITTING EAR TAF FRAUDS
www.bovinetb.co.uk/article.php?article_id=98

Dairy farmer from Elmore Back in Gloucestershire commits suicide after being investigated for ear tag and passport irregularities
John Round, 44, a dairy farmer from Elmore Back in Gloucestershire, took his own life allegedly because he was being investigated for ear tag and passport irregularities. he died after deliberately by-passing the safety cut-out on his tele-handler. He was found in the farm’s silage pit crushed against the side wall. Former Trading Standards officer, Nigel Durnford, told the inquest in Cheltenham held in September 2011 that the investigation had been about cattle, which had been sent for slaughter after reacting to bovine TB testing. He said it was believed the cattle sent for slaughter were not those which had reacted positive at the farm, and that their ear tags and cattle passports had been changed. DNA samples apparently showed none of the five cattle in question were related to their listed offspring or their dams, he said. In a statement made three weeks before his death, Mr Round said that cattle ear tags were changed when they got damaged, and some may have been given the wrong tags, but he was satisfied all the correct cattle had been sent for slaughter.

The inquest heard the father of three had been ‘worried’ about the investigation and the day before his death. He had been told that his biggest customer, Dairy Crest, would no longer buy the farm’s milk. Summing up, deputy Gloucestershire coroner, David Dooley, said he was satisfied that Mr Round had intended to take his own life. The verdict was suicide.

FLINTSHIRE FARMERS BLAME bTB FOR CATTLE NEGLECT
www.bovinetb.co.uk/article.php?article_id=99

On 22 September 2011 Mold Magistrates Court dealt with a case brothers, Gareth and Kenneth Jones, of Wern Fawr Farm, Caerwys. The two farmers (brothers) involved had apparently bought too many cows and could not afford to feed them and ‘a number of cows’ had died as a result of malnutrition. The brothers were prosecuted, by the council, for failing to provide an appropriate diet/bedding for the cows and suitable accommodation for sheep.

The judge heard that the brothers were unable to sell their cows at anything other than a considerable loss because of bovine TB ‘lockdown’ restrictions, but they could not afford to feed them all.

The brothers were given a community order, which requires them to stay indoors at their home between 9pm and 5am – Gareth Jones for four months and Kenneth for two months. Both are to be fitted with electronic tags and they were ordered to pay £6,500 each in prosecution costs.

CATTLE MOVEMENT OFFENCES NEATH
www.tradingstandardswales.org.uk/prosecutions/Monsaninalhealth.cfm and www.bovinetb.co.uk/article.php?article_id=103
Ccattle dealer from Neath, Port Talbot as well as land in Monmouthshire


At Newport magistrates court a cattle dealer who operates from Neath, Port Talbot as well as land in Monmouthshire pleaded guilty to 22 offences under the Cattle Identification (Wales) Regulations 2007 with the court being informed that there were approximately 2500 offences altogether and that the ones before them were specimens.

Offences related to moves on and off holdings under the dealers control in Neath Port Talbot and Monmouthshire and included cattle that had moved through the local livestock markets as well as various other premises across South Wales. Under the cattle identification regulations it is a requirement that all moves on and off livestock premises are notified to the British Cattle Movement Service (BCMS) within 3 days of any movement taking place.

ANGLESEY VET PRACTICE BANNED FROM bTB TESTING
www.bovinetb.co.uk/article.php?article_id=109

A veterinary practice has been banned from testing cattle for bovine TB after it was found out it wasn’t conducting the process properly. The practice is the Gaerwen based vets Bennett-Williams that sent out letters to farmers and farming unions explaining the disruption to TB testing.

Cattle farmers who use the practice for TB testing were told by Department of Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA) to make alternative testing arrangements after an audit of TB testing procedures identified the problems.

To regain the right to deal with TB, vets at the practice will need to be re-trained.

VET SUSPENDED ANGLESEY
http://www.theonlinemail.co.uk/bangor-and-anglesey-news/local-bangor-and-anglesey-news/2012/04/18/anglesey-vets-pracice-banned-from- testing-for-bovine-tb-66580-30786655
A spokesman for the Animal, Health and Veterinary Laboratories Agency (AHVLA) part of government’s DEFRA department said: “Following an audit of TB testing procedures, which identified a failure to follow standard operating procedures, AHVLA has suspended a private veterinary surgeon working in North Wales from operating as a panel 1a (bovine TB testing) official veterinarian, pending re-training.

EAR TAGGING OFFENCES, GLOUCESTER
Info from www.thisisgloucestershire.co.uk/Fraudulent-farmer-Timothy-Juckes-continued-sell/story-17573639-detail/story.html
In December 2012 a farmer was found guilty of ear tagging and related offences. The fraud offences could be summarised as deliberate swapping of identities of TB reactor cattle with healthy livestock; retaining the reactor animal and producing milk from it; and in one case having a calf born to a reactor cow. Farmer Timothy Juckes, 36, kept on selling milk from cattle which had tested positive for TB and should have been destroyed, a court heard. The farmer, from Gloucestershire, one of the alleged bTB hot spot counties and venue for one of the infamous pilot cull trials, was prosecuted by the Gloucestershire Trading Standards department. Juckes, of Tredington House, Tredington, near Tewkesbury, admitted 10 charges of fraud against Defra.

Four of his animals reacted to TB tests carried out by a Government vet and had been condemned to slaughter, Gloucester Crown Court was told. But instead of having them put down, Juckes sent the livestock to the slaughterhouse instead,. He was then paid compensation - a total of £4,173, plus £1225 for the later animal - by Defra for the livestock which should have been destroyed but he also earned money by selling milk from condemned animals. Because there is to be a Proceeds of Crime investigation into his finances to determine what assets he has and what his criminal benefit was Judge William Hart decided to adjourn sentence. He said he had a 'substantial' financial penalty and costs in mind once the Proceeds of Crime position had been finalised.

Mr Liddiard told the court that on October 15, 2010, a veterinary inspector went to Mr Juckes' farm and found that three cattle were positive reactors to TB. Another test was carried out the following month and there was a single reactor animal and he was told that, too, had to be slaughtered. The court was told that; 'The prosecution amounts to this: in reality he did not send any of the four reactor animals to slaughter. He did send four animals, but not those four.' He had sold milk from one of the animals for a year, earning £3,500 for it. "He went about ensuring that he could continue to use these animals. It was a fairly deliberate and fairly persistent process on his part," he said.

Judge William Hart told Adam Vaitilingham, defending, that he was not considering a prison sentence or an unpaid work order and a financial penalty was appropriate. He bailed Juckes to a date to be fixed after April 1, adding: "I will not be sending you to prison."

BOVINE TB REGULATIONS BREACHES INCLUDING MOVEMENTS, BUNBURY, CHESHIRE

Farmer, Anthony Kirkham, of Ridley Farm near Bunbury, has been given a four-month custodial sentence, suspended for two years, after he pleaded guilty at Crewe Magistrates Court to eight offences relating to at bovine tuberculosis (TB) restrictions.

The farm was placed under TB restrictions in April 2011, after a cow was found to have tested positive re bovine TB. This meant that animals could not be moved on or off his farm without a veterinary risk assessment being carried out and a movement licence granted.

Mr Kirkham admitted that he had moved a cow on to his farm while under restrictions without a licence and also that he had moved cattle from the TB exempt market at Chelford to ‘non-permitted destinations’.

Just a few months earlier Mr Kirkham had also been ordered to pay a fine and prosecution costs in the region of £10,000 for similar offences related to breaches of a TB restriction notice.

Additionally, Mr Kirkham had been fined £13,000 in 2003, for breaching legislation to control the spread of foot and mouth diseases.

FARMERS BREAK BOVINE TB LAWS IN SOMERSET- A BOVINE TB HOP SPOT AREAFARMER INJECTS HIS CATTLE WITH SLURRY
A former Young Dairy Farmer of the Year nominee was jailed for three years in the summer of 2001 for injecting his cattle with slurry in order to defraud the State of £20,000 bovine TB compensation. Cornelius Keane (then 38), from Bawnbue, Drimoleague, Co Cork, had pleaded guilty to five sample charges arising from his decision to inject potentially poisonous and harmful material into his 49-strong cattle herd on January 25, 2000, in a bid to obtain TB reactor grants.

Judge AG Murphy warned Keane that his cruelty merited a lifetime ban from farming but that the court did not have the power to impose this censure.

He added that Keane would have received a seven-year rather than three-year prison term but for the fact he acted out of sheer desperation to save his farm and that his wife, Mary, was then pregnant with their fifth child.

Cork Circuit Criminal Court heard that when Department of Agriculture vets inspected Keane's farm after becoming suspicious about his TB test results, they were horrified at what they found. Supt Veterinary Inspector, John Murray, told the court he found the cattle in severe pain, some of them with "half Gaelic-football-sized swellings" on their necks. These swellings were oozing poisonous puss.

The 37-year-old West Cork farmer pleaded guilty to sample offences, including breaches of the Criminal Damage Act (1991), Bovine TB Order (1989), Diseases of Animals Act (1979) and the Protection of Animals Act (1911).

The court was told Keane injected his cattle on January 25th 2000 with caustic slurry run-off from his milking parlour, a poison calculated to interfere with the accuracy of the Department of Agriculture's normal tuberculin test for TB.

His farm had already been restricted because of TB outbreaks for two years. If it was again confirmed in his herd, he stood to benefit from £21,320 in reactor grants coupled with £980 per month in income-support payments.

Info from: www.independent.ie/national-news/cruel-farmer-jailed-for-bovine-tb-fraud-345351.html

CARMARTHENSHIRE FARMER CONVICTED FOR INTERFERING WITH bTB TEST

www.bovinetb.co.uk/article.php?article_id=85

In January 2010 a Carmarthenshire farmer, William Organ of Penrhiwdilfa, Gwernogle, was convicted for interfering with bovine TB testing. He admitted 14 offences of injecting grit and other material into the cattle in an attempt to falsify the test results between September 2007 and January 2008. He was fined a total of £12,600 and ordered to pay legal costs of £3,000.

DAIRY HERD, CORNWALL PUT ON MOVEMENT RESTRICTION
www.bovinetb.co.uk/article.php?article_id=77

January 2010 the largest dairy herd in the west country, Wills Bros Ltd, was put under movement restrictions following the discovery of an inconclusive reactor during a pre-movement TB test. This restriction should have prevented any unlicensed movements onto or off the premises until a second and negative TB test had been obtained at least 60 days after the initial test. However, Defra vet, Cliff Mitchell, noticed an article and photo in the local paper, The Cornish Guardian, showing the Wills family with show results from the National All-Breeds Show at Stoneleigh, Warwickshire. This prompted a joint investigation by Defra vets and Cornwall Council's Trading Standard's animal health team. They discovered a range of errors in the herd's records.

EAR TAG FRAID POWYSs
www.bovinetb.co.uk/article.php?article_id=93

In June 2011, after admitting six offences involving swapping the identities of cattle a Powys farmer, Emyr Jones Evans of Llanfihangel-yng-Ngwynfa, near Llanfyllin received a 12 month prison sentence, suspended for 18 months for breaching bovine TB regulations. He also had to pay £28,900 in court costs.

County Fermanagh
www.bovinetb.co.uk/article_print.php?article_id=92

COUNTY FERMANAGH - INTERFERENCE WITH TEST Stephen Crawford, a County Fermanagh farmer failed to get consent for a judicial review from the Department of Agriculture after he had failed to be paid for pedigree Limousin killed following bovine tuberculosis checks. The Department of Agriculture took the decision to initially withhold £168,000 in compensation for the slaughtered cattle while suspected irregularities in the tests carried out in 2006 were investigated. Mr Crawford, of Greenhill Road, Maguiresbridge, was prosecuted for allegedly interfering with the process by administering an unknown substance. He was acquitted of all 11 charges brought against him under the Diseases of Animals (Northern Ireland) Order 1981.

EAR TAG FRAUDS GENERAL
www.bovinetb.co.uk/article.php?article_id=81
www.bovinetb.co.uk/article.php?article_id=93
www.bovinetb.co.uk/article.php?article_id=98

Investigations by the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) and Trading Standards have revealed that some farmers are swapping ear tags from dairy cattle that have tested positive for bovine TB, with animals that are less productive. The less productive animals are then sent for slaughter and the farmer is compensated for the loss. The alleged evidence of fraud originally emerged from an investigation instigated by Gloucestershire trading standards officers who reviewed TB cattle sent to two slaughterhouses. A spokesman for Defra has said that three cases in England were already on their way to prosecution and investigations are continuing.

According to media reports in 2010 there were problems of untagged cattle in Ireland. Some seventy cattle were seized in Co Cork, Ireland by the Department of Agriculture's special investigation unit and Garda teams at the start of 2010. Shortly after this they seized another 56 unidentified cattle in Co Cork. The cattle were found on a number of farms in north Cork and none of them had identification tags in their ears. The official raids took place over a number of weeks after officials from the local offices of the Department of Agriculture and Food had been concerned about certain herds in the area. Some five farms are reported to have been visited by the investigating teams, which rounded up the animals and looked for identification for them. The first of the untagged animals were uncovered in raids on two farms in the Macroom and Dunmanway areas in January 2010. According to one blog it was believed a gang was operating in the area offering to buy animals for a very low price from farmers who had failed to tag or present animals for mandatory bovine TB or brucellosis tests.

Cheshire farmers
www.bovinetb.co.uk/article.php?article_id=84 FINED FOR BREACHING TB RESTRICTIONS

Anthony Kirkham and his son Nicholas Kirkham, of Ridley Farm in Tarporley, have been fined more than £6,000 for breaching TB restrictions relating to the movement of cattle on and off Ridley Farm and Butlands Paddock, based in Spurstow, Cheshire, in breach of tuberculosis restriction notices served by the Department for the Environment Food and Rural Affairs on June 28, 2009. They appeared before South Cheshire Magistrates Court to face charges brought by Cheshire East Council’s animal health department. At the hearing on Friday January 21, Anthony Kirkham admitted 87 offences of moving cattle between January and June 2010, and asked for 102 offences to be taken into consideration. He was fined £5,756 and ordered to pay costs of £4,561.83.

SHROPSHIRE VET SUSPENDED
www.bovinetb.co.uk/article.php?article_id=80

15 March 2100 the Disciplinary Committee of the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons (RCVS) suspended from the Register for ten months a veterinary surgeon found to have dishonestly certified that he carried out bovine tuberculosis (TB) testing and measured and recorded the test reactions of 248 cattle, when in fact he knew he had not tested all the animals. The RCVS is the regulatory body for veterinary surgeons in the UK and deals with issues of professional misconduct, maintaining the register of veterinary surgeons eligible to practise in the UK and assuring standards of veterinary education.



CATTLE SHOT WREXHAM
www.bovinetb.co.uk/article.php?article_id=83
AT In a rather unusual incident thirty cattle were shot in March 2011 after escaping from a farm. A council spokesman said the cull was not due to disease but with WAG’s obsession with eradicating bovine TB and biosecurity we wonder if this was the underlying reason for the action taken in this case. Certainly it raises many questions.

CEREDIGION VET SUSPENDED
www.bovinetb.co.uk/article.php?article_id=88

Vet denies failing to carry out accurate checks for bovine TB and submitting paperwork which reported he had done so. Alleged he tested 104 animals, but allegedly simply glanced at some and used his thumb and forefinger to measure others instead of using proper instruments. Failure to measure folds some or all of the records entered on the certificate were false and he was inaccurate in his certification.

DAIRY FARMER COMMITS SUICIDE AFTER COMMITTING EAR TAF FRAUDS
www.bovinetb.co.uk/article.php?article_id=98

Dairy farmer from Elmore Back in Gloucestershire commits suicide after being investigated for ear tag and passport irregularities
John Round, 44, a dairy farmer from Elmore Back in Gloucestershire, took his own life allegedly because he was being investigated for ear tag and passport irregularities. he died after deliberately by-passing the safety cut-out on his tele-handler. He was found in the farm’s silage pit crushed against the side wall. Former Trading Standards officer, Nigel Durnford, told the inquest in Cheltenham held in September 2011 that the investigation had been about cattle, which had been sent for slaughter after reacting to bovine TB testing. He said it was believed the cattle sent for slaughter were not those which had reacted positive at the farm, and that their ear tags and cattle passports had been changed. DNA samples apparently showed none of the five cattle in question were related to their listed offspring or their dams, he said. In a statement made three weeks before his death, Mr Round said that cattle ear tags were changed when they got damaged, and some may have been given the wrong tags, but he was satisfied all the correct cattle had been sent for slaughter.

The inquest heard the father of three had been ‘worried’ about the investigation and the day before his death. He had been told that his biggest customer, Dairy Crest, would no longer buy the farm’s milk. Summing up, deputy Gloucestershire coroner, David Dooley, said he was satisfied that Mr Round had intended to take his own life. The verdict was suicide.

FLINTSHIRE FARMERS BLAME bTB FOR CATTLE NEGLECT
www.bovinetb.co.uk/article.php?article_id=99

On 22 September 2011 Mold Magistrates Court dealt with a case brothers, Gareth and Kenneth Jones, of Wern Fawr Farm, Caerwys. The two farmers (brothers) involved had apparently bought too many cows and could not afford to feed them and ‘a number of cows’ had died as a result of malnutrition. The brothers were prosecuted, by the council, for failing to provide an appropriate diet/bedding for the cows and suitable accommodation for sheep.

The judge heard that the brothers were unable to sell their cows at anything other than a considerable loss because of bovine TB ‘lockdown’ restrictions, but they could not afford to feed them all.

The brothers were given a community order, which requires them to stay indoors at their home between 9pm and 5am – Gareth Jones for four months and Kenneth for two months. Both are to be fitted with electronic tags and they were ordered to pay £6,500 each in prosecution costs.

CATTLE MOVEMENT OFFENCES NEATH
www.tradingstandardswales.org.uk/prosecutions/Monsaninalhealth.cfm and www.bovinetb.co.uk/article.php?article_id=103
Ccattle dealer from Neath, Port Talbot as well as land in Monmouthshire


At Newport magistrates court a cattle dealer who operates from Neath, Port Talbot as well as land in Monmouthshire pleaded guilty to 22 offences under the Cattle Identification (Wales) Regulations 2007 with the court being informed that there were approximately 2500 offences altogether and that the ones before them were specimens.

Offences related to moves on and off holdings under the dealers control in Neath Port Talbot and Monmouthshire and included cattle that had moved through the local livestock markets as well as various other premises across South Wales. Under the cattle identification regulations it is a requirement that all moves on and off livestock premises are notified to the British Cattle Movement Service (BCMS) within 3 days of any movement taking place.

ANGLESEY VET PRACTICE BANNED FROM bTB TESTING
www.bovinetb.co.uk/article.php?article_id=109

A veterinary practice has been banned from testing cattle for bovine TB after it was found out it wasn’t conducting the process properly. The practice is the Gaerwen based vets Bennett-Williams that sent out letters to farmers and farming unions explaining the disruption to TB testing.

Cattle farmers who use the practice for TB testing were told by Department of Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA) to make alternative testing arrangements after an audit of TB testing procedures identified the problems.

To regain the right to deal with TB, vets at the practice will need to be re-trained.

VET SUSPENDED ANGLESEY
http://www.theonlinemail.co.uk/bangor-and-anglesey-news/local-bangor-and-anglesey-news/2012/04/18/anglesey-vets-pracice-banned-from- testing-for-bovine-tb-66580-30786655
A spokesman for the Animal, Health and Veterinary Laboratories Agency (AHVLA) part of government’s DEFRA department said: “Following an audit of TB testing procedures, which identified a failure to follow standard operating procedures, AHVLA has suspended a private veterinary surgeon working in North Wales from operating as a panel 1a (bovine TB testing) official veterinarian, pending re-training.

EAR TAGGING OFFENCES, GLOUCESTER
Info from www.thisisgloucestershire.co.uk/Fraudulent-farmer-Timothy-Juckes-continued-sell/story-17573639-detail/story.html
In December 2012 a farmer was found guilty of ear tagging and related offences. The fraud offences could be summarised as deliberate swapping of identities of TB reactor cattle with healthy livestock; retaining the reactor animal and producing milk from it; and in one case having a calf born to a reactor cow. Farmer Timothy Juckes, 36, kept on selling milk from cattle which had tested positive for TB and should have been destroyed, a court heard. The farmer, from Gloucestershire, one of the alleged bTB hot spot counties and venue for one of the infamous pilot cull trials, was prosecuted by the Gloucestershire Trading Standards department. Juckes, of Tredington House, Tredington, near Tewkesbury, admitted 10 charges of fraud against Defra.

Four of his animals reacted to TB tests carried out by a Government vet and had been condemned to slaughter, Gloucester Crown Court was told. But instead of having them put down, Juckes sent the livestock to the slaughterhouse instead,. He was then paid compensation - a total of £4,173, plus £1225 for the later animal - by Defra for the livestock which should have been destroyed but he also earned money by selling milk from condemned animals. Because there is to be a Proceeds of Crime investigation into his finances to determine what assets he has and what his criminal benefit was Judge William Hart decided to adjourn sentence. He said he had a 'substantial' financial penalty and costs in mind once the Proceeds of Crime position had been finalised.

Mr Liddiard told the court that on October 15, 2010, a veterinary inspector went to Mr Juckes' farm and found that three cattle were positive reactors to TB. Another test was carried out the following month and there was a single reactor animal and he was told that, too, had to be slaughtered. The court was told that; 'The prosecution amounts to this: in reality he did not send any of the four reactor animals to slaughter. He did send four animals, but not those four.' He had sold milk from one of the animals for a year, earning £3,500 for it. "He went about ensuring that he could continue to use these animals. It was a fairly deliberate and fairly persistent process on his part," he said.

Judge William Hart told Adam Vaitilingham, defending, that he was not considering a prison sentence or an unpaid work order and a financial penalty was appropriate. He bailed Juckes to a date to be fixed after April 1, adding: "I will not be sending you to prison."

BOVINE TB REGULATIONS BREACHES INCLUDING MOVEMENTS, BUNBURY, CHESHIRE

Farmer, Anthony Kirkham, of Ridley Farm near Bunbury, has been given a four-month custodial sentence, suspended for two years, after he pleaded guilty at Crewe Magistrates Court to eight offences relating to at bovine tuberculosis (TB) restrictions.

The farm was placed under TB restrictions in April 2011, after a cow was found to have tested positive re bovine TB. This meant that animals could not be moved on or off his farm without a veterinary risk assessment being carried out and a movement licence granted.

Mr Kirkham admitted that he had moved a cow on to his farm while under restrictions without a licence and also that he had moved cattle from the TB exempt market at Chelford to ‘non-permitted destinations’.

Just a few months earlier Mr Kirkham had also been ordered to pay a fine and prosecution costs in the region of £10,000 for similar offences related to breaches of a TB restriction notice.

Additionally, Mr Kirkham had been fined £13,000 in 2003, for breaching legislation to control the spread of foot and mouth diseases.

FARMERS BREAK LAW IN BOVINE TB HOT SPOT AREA.

Mother and daughter Kathleen Wallis, 61, and Sarah Wallis, 23, of Appleton Farm, at Wick St Lawrence, near Weston-super-Mare, admitted 18 counts of providing false information as to the location of a number of their cattle when they appeared before Bristol Crown Court. The farmers admitted to failing to adhere to cattle disease control laws and were branded "ignorant, rotten and cruel" by a judge. North Somerset Council trading standards officers and the Animal Health and Veterinary Laboratory Agency discovered the cattle had been moved to Wick St Lawrence in 2011 without being subject to mandatory pre-movement tuberculosis testing, in an attempt to dodge laws designed to prevent outbreaks from spreading. Judge Julian Lambert gave Kathleen Wallis a seven-month suspended jail sentence and two-year community order. He told her she was "stubborn, ignorant, rotten and cruel" and would face immediate jail if she offended again. She has to pay costs of £16,960. Sarah Wallis was given a two-year community order and told to do 210 hours of unpaid work. The court heard that both farmers had previous animal movement or welfare-related convictions.

www.thisisbristol.co.uk/Farmer-ignored-cattle-control-laws/story-19452126-detail/story.html#axzz2XsJUzJ7y

A TEWKESBURY FARMER HAS BEEN FINED AFTER SELLING MILK FROM CATTLE WITH BTB.

1 Jul 2013, 7:31 PM A Tewkesbury farmer has been fined after selling milk from cattle with bTB. The cattle which had tested positive for TB but the farmer, Timothy Juckes, refused to believe the cows had the disease. He sent four cows without the disease to the slaughterhouse instead of the infected animals, Gloucester Crown Court heard on 28th June 2013. He then took compensation from Defra for the livestock, which should have been destroyed.

The court heard Juckes was not motivated by greed to commit the crime, but by his previous experiences of losing cattle because of the TB regulations of Defra (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs).

Between 2004 and 2009 six of his cattle tested positive for TB but he was ordered to slaughter a total of 60 because it was possible they could have the disease.

The court heard that the milk from the infected cows would not have posed a health risk to the public.

Judge William Hart said Juckes, of Tredington House, Tredington, near Tewkesbury, had ignored the principles of "proper and honest" dealings."He believes these cows probably did not have TB and thought he would be destroying healthy animals he had reared," he said. However, he told Juckes he should not have ignored the order from Defra. The judge said: "It is not for you, or any farmer, to second guess the department. In our society we have to trust matters of this sort to the authorities, whether or not you agree with them. You are obliged to comply with the law. You are fundamentally a decent and honest farmer and you have fallen from grace with the commission of these offences."

Juckes was ordered to pay back £5,398 in compensation to the government department.

He was also told to pay back the £12,592 he made from continuing to milk the infected heifers and sell their produce.

The 36-year-old was also fined £14,000 and ordered to pay £20,000 in costs after he was prosecuted by Gloucestershire's Trading Standards department for 10 counts of fraud in connection with selling the milk.

Judge Hart said it was an expensive lesson for the farmer whose reputation had also suffered as a result of his actions. The court heard no public or animal health offences were committed.

Three cows were found to have the disease in October 15, 2010, and another the following month.

Info from: www.thisisgloucestershire.co.uk/Tewkesbury-farmer-sold-milk-cattle-TB/story-19428302-detail/story.html#axzz2XmVKMnlv www.telegraph.co.uk/earth/earthnews/10151399/Bovine-TB-in-milk-as-well-as-beef.html

SUFFOLK FARMER CHARGED
http://www.eadt.co.uk/news/saxmundham_farmer_due_in_court_on_39_charges_relating_to_his_cattle_1_2968812

October 2013 Ipswich Crown Court ordered a Suffolk farmer, Eric Moss, of Botany Farm, Farnham, near Saxmundham, to pay a total of £116,000 after unlawfully slaughtering cattle and illegally selling meat across the county. At the end of a long-running case, the court ordered Moss to repay £83,000 as proceeds of crime. He was also fined £15,000 after 
previously admitting not registering or recording his cattle movements, births, or deaths between July 2007 and May 2009. Moss was also told to pay a total of £18,000 in costs.

He was also due in court November 2013 to face 39 charges relating to the welfare of his animals and failing to comply with farming regulations. The welfare allegations involving refer to around 100 cattle. Moss’ company ARP Farms Ltd, in Sible Hedingham, near Halstead, is also accused of 30 offences of a similar nature. The total period spanned by the charges dates from February 19 to July 13.

Moss is a nationally recognised expert on Red Poll cattle. He is also a former member of the National Farmers’ Union livestock board.

WILTSHIRE VET STRUCK OFF

In May 2013 the Disciplinary Committee of the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons struck off the Register a veterinary surgeon for charges relating to tuberculin (TB) testing on cattle that he undertook and certified at four farms during June and July of 2010.

At the end of the ten-day hearing, the Disciplinary Committee found Sorin Dinu Chelemen guilty of 32 charges relating to his work as an Official Veterinarian (OV) for Animal Health while employed as a locum at Endell Veterinary Group, Salisbury.

“The Committee is of the view that this is a most serious case, in which the integrity of TB testing was undermined, and animal health was put at risk, which may have resulted in the spread of disease,” said Mrs Judith Webb, chairing and speaking on behalf of the Committee.

Info from: www.rcvs.org.uk/news-and-events/news/disciplinary-committee-strikes-off-wiltshire-vet/

http://philsreport.blogspot.co.uk/2013/10/vet-responsible-for-btb-spread-in-uk.html

ATHENRY, IRELAND

Athenry farmer in court charged under Bovine TB Order. An Athenry farmer has received the benefit of the Probation Act after he pleaded guilty to three charges under the Bovine Tuberculosis Order.

John Feeney of Willmount House in Castleturvin appeared before Loughrea District Court.

Mr. Feeney faced three charges for his failure to effectively isolate reactors from the remainder of the herd.

Taking account of his personal circumstances at the time of the offences, Judge Jeffrey Browne applied the Probation Act.

He also ordered Mr. Feeney to pay 500 euro to the court poor box.

http://www.galwaybayfm.ie/component/k2/item/4343-athenry-farmer-in-court-charged-under-bovine-tb-order

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